Type of game:
Ball Game
Character of the game:
Competitive
Country of origin:
Hungary
Aim of the game:
This bat and ball game is about scoring more runs as the opponent and to maintain the inning as long as possible.
Number of players:
Multi Player
12-24 (6 to 12 on a team)
Age
5 +
Difficulty:
Medium
Area of play:
Indoor or outdoor free space depending on the number of players; usually 20 x 40 m
Indoor Outdoor
Equipment
Ball flat bat 80 to 100 cm long and a soft tennis ball or smaller plastic ball
Motor skills
Coordination Balance Speed
Social skills
Cooperation Competion Decision Making Communication Team building
Cognitive skills
Strategy Building Tactics
equipment
Background
Origin of the Game: The British Rounders game is known from the 16th century. It is a variation of the ancient Greek Rounders (Hajdu Gyula, 1971). The Hungarian variant of Rounders is adapted from the Greek-Roman era. It was played as a fortress/castle game. It was and is still more or less popular in Central European countries e.g. former Soviet Union republics and Yugoslavia (particularly in Serbia as Serbian Rounders), Poland (palant, kwadrant), Bulgaria, Romania (oina). In USA the game is known as a baseball or softball and in UK regular Rounders is usually played at school level. Different variations of that game are played in India, Sri Lanka, Finland (pesapallo), China and Japan. Middle Ages was a blooming period of bat-and-ball games in Hungary (Budapest, Bratislava-SK, Fehérvár, Oradea-ROM, Pécs). A parallelism between the games played and history can be recalled (as a result of the country’s and its society’s development and revolution).   History of the Game: At first Running Rounders was played among students and youth. Students in the same age and class formed the teams and the teams competed against each other. Some of these teams became very famous and competed against local university teams. This brought interest among local citizens and raised attention for the game. As a popular request more competitions were held. Those losing the game had a chance to play on another game against the winner, which was important not to be remembered as a ‘loser’. Games were put on agenda, mostly during spring time (as Easter tournament). It was important to win the game otherwise a loser team had to wait one year for a revenge that did not give good reflection on the position. Due to the fact that many of these games ended up with fighting – even though referees were present, a certain number of people among the spectators were prearranged to assist and maintain peacefulness. Students were very active during vacation time as well and organized their own teams in their own home place. In the countryside it was less “violent” than in the cities, where the rules were adjusted to their own way. In rural areas it was mostly played just for fun. The game was particularly popular among men. Competition was between similar age groups. Women were not welcome but they were present on the competitions as spectators.   Cultural Significance: The author Lajos Porzsolt mentions the blooming of ball games in cities and among knights, lords and even kings in the era of King Matthias 1st and the Bathories (1458-1602). During the games young and old, rich and poor both appeared to play, or at least to watch the championship games. As the author notes,  Rounders was later preserved by the lower class (Porzsolt Lajos, 1885) –  it was kept among the peasants who did not have the time to play as much as the citizens (father played with son). Because they changed the rules, the original Rounders game disappeared but is since then played in many different ways. To see more about running rounder, please visit:http://w3.extermet.hu/~bbvkk/helyiertek/futometa
Set up:
Select any indoor or outdoor area that allows the players to move freely within defined sidelines or borders delimited by cones or other equipment. Players batting are not allowed to cross the sidelines. The field has a baseline and a home base from where players start running, as well as a target (e.g. a line or wall) to reach before running back to home base in order to score. It is an inclusive game for both genders lasting 30 minutes where a referee is needed.
Rules
This inning and fielding game with no contact engages two teams that ‘fight’ against each other (6 to 12 people per team). The offensive or inning team tries to score as many runs as possible. The defensive or fielding team playing in the outfield prevents the offensive team from scoring runs by catching the ball and aiming/throwing it to the opponent below the knee. All offensive players stand behind the home base. Taking turns, they hit the ball with their bat and try to reach baseline and home base – passing via the target – before the defensive players have the chance to throw the ball at them (as in dodgeball games). In case the player from the inning team reaches the baseline legally and arrives back to the home base before the ball hits him, the team playing the inning scores a run. In this case the next player from the same inning team will hit the ball. When the defensive team plays the ball to the player running between the home base and the target and the ball hits his body, the runner is out and has to return to the home base. No score is added. When there are three outs, a chance of winning occurs and the defensive team moves to the home base for their inning. The team that scores the most runs in one period wins. The team that scores the most period points wins the game.
Teaching Styles:
  • Provide clear and simple instruction
  • Balance the ability level of the teams
  • Practice games before introducing scoring
  • Encourage players to establish basic hand communication
  • Safety instructions to be tailored to the environment and participants playing the game
Rules:
  • Vary the way batters receive the ball. (Eg. the ball is hit from a tee; the ball is rolled)
  • The defensive team must pass the ball three times before throwing the ball at the runner.
  • Set up target zones to allow players gain bonus points.
Environment:
  • Increase/decrease the distance between each base.
  • Increase/decrease the boundaries of the game.
  • Increase/decrease pitching distance.
  • Create 3-5 circles in the field from which the field players may throw the ball at the runner.
  • Ensure the indoor/outdoor playing area has a smooth surface and is free of obstacles
Equipment:
  • Range of balls can be used that vary in weight, size, speed, texture, density etc.
  • Range of bats that vary in weight, size and material can be used
  • Audible equipment can be used ( e.g. bell or rattle ball, bases that have a buzzer)
  • Brightly coloured equipment can be used
  • Players hold a rope between bases to allow the runner to follow the path
  • Use cones to mark the boundaries on the field
Background
Origin of the Game: The British Rounders game is known from the 16th century. It is a variation of the ancient Greek Rounders (Hajdu Gyula, 1971). The Hungarian variant of Rounders is adapted from the Greek-Roman era. It was played as a fortress/castle game. It was and is still more or less popular in Central European countries e.g. former Soviet Union republics and Yugoslavia (particularly in Serbia as Serbian Rounders), Poland (palant, kwadrant), Bulgaria, Romania (oina). In USA the game is known as a baseball or softball and in UK regular Rounders is usually played at school level. Different variations of that game are played in India, Sri Lanka, Finland (pesapallo), China and Japan. Middle Ages was a blooming period of bat-and-ball games in Hungary (Budapest, Bratislava-SK, Fehérvár, Oradea-ROM, Pécs). A parallelism between the games played and history can be recalled (as a result of the country’s and its society’s development and revolution).   History of the Game: At first Running Rounders was played among students and youth. Students in the same age and class formed the teams and the teams competed against each other. Some of these teams became very famous and competed against local university teams. This brought interest among local citizens and raised attention for the game. As a popular request more competitions were held. Those losing the game had a chance to play on another game against the winner, which was important not to be remembered as a ‘loser’. Games were put on agenda, mostly during spring time (as Easter tournament). It was important to win the game otherwise a loser team had to wait one year for a revenge that did not give good reflection on the position. Due to the fact that many of these games ended up with fighting – even though referees were present, a certain number of people among the spectators were prearranged to assist and maintain peacefulness. Students were very active during vacation time as well and organized their own teams in their own home place. In the countryside it was less “violent” than in the cities, where the rules were adjusted to their own way. In rural areas it was mostly played just for fun. The game was particularly popular among men. Competition was between similar age groups. Women were not welcome but they were present on the competitions as spectators.   Cultural Significance: The author Lajos Porzsolt mentions the blooming of ball games in cities and among knights, lords and even kings in the era of King Matthias 1st and the Bathories (1458-1602). During the games young and old, rich and poor both appeared to play, or at least to watch the championship games. As the author notes,  Rounders was later preserved by the lower class (Porzsolt Lajos, 1885) –  it was kept among the peasants who did not have the time to play as much as the citizens (father played with son). Because they changed the rules, the original Rounders game disappeared but is since then played in many different ways. To see more about running rounder, please visit:http://w3.extermet.hu/~bbvkk/helyiertek/futometa