Type of game:
Ball Game
Character of the game:
Competitive
Country of origin:
Ireland
Aim of the game:
To score more runs than the opposition team.
Number of players:
Multi Player
7 or 9 a side
Age
12 +
Difficulty:
Medium
Area of play:
The recommended maximum playing field dimensions are as follows: 55m x 55m; infield area 20m x 20m; T Zone (within infield area) 10m x 10m; bases 64cm.
Outdoor
Equipment
Ball Rounders bat, Rounders ball, T Ball Tee, base markers.
Motor skills
Coordination
Social skills
Cooperation Communication
Cognitive skills
Strategy Building Tactics
equipment
Background
When the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) was founded in 1884, Rounders, along with Hurling, Gaelic Football, and Handball were the core games. GAA Rounders caters for children and adults alike and is played all over the island of Ireland and further afield. In keeping with this, it has been noted that GAA Rounders was popularised in America in line with the flow of Irish emigration and through this, it is believed that the roots of American Baseball can be traced back to GAA Rounders. Although an official set of playing rules has been in existence since the inception of the GAA in 1884, a limited amount of GAA Rounders was played in its formative years. From the late 1950’s, GAA Rounders thrived up until the mid-1980's. From this point, it was noted that, due to a declining population in traditional Rounders heartlands, there was a decrease in playing numbers. However since 2008, the GAA Rounders Committee has invigorated the game of GAA Rounders and it is now growing in popularity.
Recreational GAA Rounders is a modern adaptation of the Rounders traditional game devised to cater for a diversified population based on traditional principles and ethos of participation opportunities for all. While Recreational Rounders has many common features with Rounders, the one significant difference is that it is played with a batting tee (T Ball Tee). The playing guidelines reflect the social and recreational nature of Recreational Rounders. The underlying philosophy of Recreational Rounders is that Gaelic Games should be fun, enjoyable and accessible. Recreational Rounders is a new innovative approach to Gaelic Games and it is hoped that participants will gain maximum enjoyment and benefit from their involvement in Recreational Rounders and, in the process, will experience an enhanced sense of esteem, health and wellbeing.   
Set up:
Recreational Rounders should be played outdoors, preferably on a grassy surface matching the dimensions set out above. There are 4 bases used to complete a run namely home base (H), 1st base (1), 2nd base (2) and 3rd base (3). Extending out from home base there is an area known as the T zone. Within the T zone the T Ball Tee is placed within the T zone.
Rules
Batting team strike the ball off the T Ball Tee, out of the T zone and run to 1st base. Navigate through the bases and return to the home base to score a run for the batting team. Each member of the batting team has 3 attempts, in rotation, per inning, at striking the ball i.e. batting team maximum number of shots is 21. However, if a player on the fielding team catches the ball or tags the batting player, before he/she reaches the base or touches the base, while in possession of the ball, that player is out. If the Fielding team gets 3 Batting team players declared out before the maximum 21 shots, then the play switches over. Once this happens, it is the batting’s team chance to cover the bases and field of play and become the fielding team. After 3 innings, the team with the most runs is declared the winner.
Teaching Styles:
  • Provide clear and simple instruction
  • Balance the ability level of the teams
  • Practice games before introducing scoring
  • Encourage players to communicate throughout the game
  • Safety instructions to be tailored to the environment and participants playing the game
Rules:
  • Other players may also have a support person who shadows or guides them around the bases.
  • Certain players may nominate a ‘runner’ who runs the bases after the ball has been hit from the tee.
  • Create a zone in the ‘in field’ (in front of the tee). Fielders are not allowed into this area to field the ball and must wait until the ball stops or passes through the zone. This will allow more time for some players to reach first base.
  • Target zones can be set up for batters to gain bonus points. Zones for distance and accuracy can be used here and the size of these zones can be adjusted to suit skill level of the group
  • Batters choose for a selection of bats to strike the ball.
Environment:
  • Ensure the indoor/outdoor playing area has a smooth surface and is free of obstacles
  • Increase / decrease the distance between the bases.
  • Increase / decrease the playing area for fielders to cover.
Equipment:
  • Range of bats that vary in weight, size or material can be used e.g. tennis rackets, table tennis racket, hurleys, baseball bat etc.
  • Range of balls can be used that vary in weight, size, speed, texture, density etc.
  • Audible equipment can be used, e.g. bell or rattle balls and bases that have a buzzer, or a player can be stationed at the bases calling or clapping so the batter knows where they are going.
  • Bases are linked by rope to allow players to hold the rope and follow the rope to the next base
Background
When the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) was founded in 1884, Rounders, along with Hurling, Gaelic Football, and Handball were the core games. GAA Rounders caters for children and adults alike and is played all over the island of Ireland and further afield. In keeping with this, it has been noted that GAA Rounders was popularised in America in line with the flow of Irish emigration and through this, it is believed that the roots of American Baseball can be traced back to GAA Rounders. Although an official set of playing rules has been in existence since the inception of the GAA in 1884, a limited amount of GAA Rounders was played in its formative years. From the late 1950’s, GAA Rounders thrived up until the mid-1980's. From this point, it was noted that, due to a declining population in traditional Rounders heartlands, there was a decrease in playing numbers. However since 2008, the GAA Rounders Committee has invigorated the game of GAA Rounders and it is now growing in popularity.
Recreational GAA Rounders is a modern adaptation of the Rounders traditional game devised to cater for a diversified population based on traditional principles and ethos of participation opportunities for all. While Recreational Rounders has many common features with Rounders, the one significant difference is that it is played with a batting tee (T Ball Tee). The playing guidelines reflect the social and recreational nature of Recreational Rounders. The underlying philosophy of Recreational Rounders is that Gaelic Games should be fun, enjoyable and accessible. Recreational Rounders is a new innovative approach to Gaelic Games and it is hoped that participants will gain maximum enjoyment and benefit from their involvement in Recreational Rounders and, in the process, will experience an enhanced sense of esteem, health and wellbeing.