Type of game:
Throwing Game
Character of the game:
Competitive
Country of origin:
Finland
Aim of the game:
To knock out as many skittles as possible during two halves.
Number of players:
Multi Player
1-4 per team
Age
4 +
Difficulty:
Medium
Area of play:
Gravel surface 7 x 22 m. The field is divided into two “playing squares” squares 5 x 5 m, which are 10 m apart from each other.
Outdoor
Equipment

Skittles and bats: team games use 20 skittles and 2 bats and individual games use 10 skittles and 4 bats.
Motor skills
Coordination Balance
Social skills
Cooperation Decision Making
Cognitive skills
Tactics
equipment
Background

Origin of the game:
In Finland (Karelia) this game was first mentioned in 1994 in the diaries of Finnish author and photographer I. K. Inha in his travel in White Karelia. He wrote about a game that was played around Lake Ladoga, Suojarvi and Salmi, but even there it was only played in remote villages. The game was also known in Karelian Isthmus and Ingria areas. After the kinship wars, people that had immigrated to Finland played skittles during Karelian summer festivals. In 1951 there was a movement to revitalize Finnish skittles with the approval of President Urho Kekkonen. A set of rules and a scoring system were created taking into account the traditional Karelian skittles terms and rules. The Karelian Skittles Association was registered in 1986 and the name was changed to Finnish Skittles Association in 1993. The Finnish Skittles Association is a member of the Finnish Sports Federation SLU (Suomen Liikunta ja Urheilu), a non-governmental sports federation for over one million Finns. The chairman of Finnish Skittles Association is the former 3000 m steeplechase world record holder Pentti Karvonen.

History of the game: Men's team event was the first form of competitive skittles in Finland. During 1951-1961 the Finnish championships for the men's team event were held in Seurasaari, Helsinki. Since 1961 the games have been held together with the Karelian summer festivals around Finland. The men's individual event was added to the curriculum in 1954, but the first championship medals were given in 1964, when the sport was officially given a championship status. In 1971, the first Finnish championship medals for veterans were given at the individual event. At the end of the 1980s, a new form of play was introduced, as the first Finnish Championship for individual pentathlon was held. The latest addition in Finnish Skittles is men's pairs event in 2005. The first individual championships for women were held in 1973 and women's pairs event in 1980.

More about Finnish skittles may be found on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_skittles or Suomen Kyykkäliitto,
http://www.kyykkaliitto.fi/http://www.kyykkaliitto.fi/saannot.php#gamerules.
Set up:
The outdoor playing field has a gravel surface. Draw the pitch on the ground and place the skittles in the “playing squares” as described in “area of play” and shown in the illustration. The home team's throwing square is the playing square of the opponent. Children under 10 years old playing this game use smaller squares, perhaps 3 m x 3 m, and the distance between the squares is shorter - 6 m. It is a game for both genders with no contact and no referee needed.
Rules
This throwing and aiming game can be played with four-man teams, in pairs or as an individual game. In team and pair games, the players have two bats at their disposal. In individual games, four bats can be used per turn. Each player in his turn steps up into the throwing square and throws the bat, trying to knock the skittles out of the opponent’s playing square. Skittles thrown out of the playing square yield two points; unused bats yield 1 point; skittles remaining in the playing square yield two minus points and skittles remaining on the square lines yield one minus point. The first half ends when a team or player clears its playing square from skittles. The opponent may throw the same number of bats per half. After this, sides are changed, and the second half is played like the first one. The team with the highest total score is the winner. The winner is awarded two points for the victory. When the play ends in a tie, both teams receive one point. A defeat gives 0 points.

In individual games, 20 bats per half may be used. The players alternatively throw four bats. When there are no skittles on the field, sides are changed and the second half is played like the first one. The final score of the player is the total result of both halves. The player or team with the highest total score wins.
Teaching Styles:
  • Provide clear and simple instruction
  • Balance the ability level of the team
  • Complete a walk through the playing area
  • Practice games before introducing scoring
  • Encourage players to communicate throughout the game
  • Safety instructions to be tailored to the environment and participants playing the game. 
Rules:
  • Remove negative scoring. -
  • Adjust bonus point system according to ability level.
  • Introduce a time limit (e.g. the team that knocks the most skittles in 30 seconds wins)
Environment:
  • Increase/decrease the throwing distance.
  • Increase/decrease the size of playing area.
  • Ensure the playing area has a smooth surface and is free of obstacles
Equipment:
  • Range of balls can be used that vary in weight, size, speed, texture, density etc.
  • Range of skittles that vary in weight, size and material can be used
  • Audible equipment can be used ( e.g. the skittles and bats have a buzzer)
  • Brightly coloured equipment can be used
  • Use bowls and a ramp.
Background

Origin of the game:
In Finland (Karelia) this game was first mentioned in 1994 in the diaries of Finnish author and photographer I. K. Inha in his travel in White Karelia. He wrote about a game that was played around Lake Ladoga, Suojarvi and Salmi, but even there it was only played in remote villages. The game was also known in Karelian Isthmus and Ingria areas. After the kinship wars, people that had immigrated to Finland played skittles during Karelian summer festivals. In 1951 there was a movement to revitalize Finnish skittles with the approval of President Urho Kekkonen. A set of rules and a scoring system were created taking into account the traditional Karelian skittles terms and rules. The Karelian Skittles Association was registered in 1986 and the name was changed to Finnish Skittles Association in 1993. The Finnish Skittles Association is a member of the Finnish Sports Federation SLU (Suomen Liikunta ja Urheilu), a non-governmental sports federation for over one million Finns. The chairman of Finnish Skittles Association is the former 3000 m steeplechase world record holder Pentti Karvonen.

History of the game: Men's team event was the first form of competitive skittles in Finland. During 1951-1961 the Finnish championships for the men's team event were held in Seurasaari, Helsinki. Since 1961 the games have been held together with the Karelian summer festivals around Finland. The men's individual event was added to the curriculum in 1954, but the first championship medals were given in 1964, when the sport was officially given a championship status. In 1971, the first Finnish championship medals for veterans were given at the individual event. At the end of the 1980s, a new form of play was introduced, as the first Finnish Championship for individual pentathlon was held. The latest addition in Finnish Skittles is men's pairs event in 2005. The first individual championships for women were held in 1973 and women's pairs event in 1980.

More about Finnish skittles may be found on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_skittles or Suomen Kyykkäliitto,
http://www.kyykkaliitto.fi/http://www.kyykkaliitto.fi/saannot.php#gamerules.