Type of game:
Locomotion Game
Character of the game:
Non-Competitive
Country of origin:
Poland
Aim of the game:
To change places from one corner to anohter as fast as possible and without being caught by the chaser.
Number of players:
Multi Player
5 - 15
Age
6 +
Difficulty:
Medium
Area of play:
Indoor or outdoor free space; the size depends on the number of players (from 5x5 m up to 8x8m)
Indoor Outdoor
Equipment

5 cones or poles (to mark the ‘corners’ and ‘the stove’; if played by more players bibs or sashes are needed
Motor skills
Speed Endurance
Social skills
Cooperation Competion Decision Making
Cognitive skills
Strategy Building Tactics Memory Development
equipment
Background
The origin of the game is probably French, but it was also played in different countries all over Europe under a variety of names: Bulgaria “Ugli”, France “Quatre coins”, Spain “Las cuatro  esquinas”, Italy “I quarter canton”, England “ Puss in the corner”, Netherlands “Vierhoeken”) (Pasecki, 1959). Polish Ethnographer Lukas Golebiowski, claims that this game was very popular between 18th and 19th century as a common way for nobles to spend their pastime in their chambers in the winter time and gardens during spring, summer and autumn times (1831). Currently it is considered a traditional game in Poland.

1. Piasecki E., Tradycyjne gry i zabawy ruchowe oraz ich geneza, in: 40 lat od Katedry WF UP do Wyższej Szkoły Wychowania Fizycznego w Poznaniu, Prace okresu Katedry i Studium WF WSW, Poznań 1959, pp. 95- 303.
2. Gołębiowski Ł., Gry i zabawy różnych stanów, w kraju całym lub w niektórych tylko prowincjach, Warszawa 1831.
Set up:
Any indoor or outdoor area that allows the players to move freely.  The four corners of the play area with poles, cones, bibs or sashes, as well as the “stove” in the middle of the playing area.
Rules
Four players stand in the corners and at the same time one – the chaser – stands at the stove. The game starts when the chaser says: four corners and the stove. After hearing this saying, all players from the corners have to change their places/corners as fast as possible not to allow the chaser to reach one of the corners. If the chaser is faster than one of the ‘corner’ players they change places and from this point on the corner player becomes a chaser. This is an inclusive, contact game which can be played by boys and girls in all seasons on any available surface. It has no limit of duration.
Teaching Styles:
  • Provide clear and simple instruction
  • Complete a walk through the playing area
  • Encourage players to communicate throughout the game
  • Safety instructions to be tailored to the environment and participants playing the game
Rules:
  • Change movement pattern (e.g. skipping, hopping, and crawling). 
  • Increase/decrease time limit
  • Increase/decrease number of players
Environment:
  • Increase/decrease the playing area/distance/ boundaries/zones/pitching distance/shape
  • Ensure the indoor/outdoor playing area has a smooth surface and is free of obstacles
Equipment:
  • Audible equipment can be used ( e.g. bell or rattle ball, bases that have a buzzer)
  • Brightly coloured equipment can be used, to mark corners
  • Brightly coloured bibs can be worn
 
Background
The origin of the game is probably French, but it was also played in different countries all over Europe under a variety of names: Bulgaria “Ugli”, France “Quatre coins”, Spain “Las cuatro  esquinas”, Italy “I quarter canton”, England “ Puss in the corner”, Netherlands “Vierhoeken”) (Pasecki, 1959). Polish Ethnographer Lukas Golebiowski, claims that this game was very popular between 18th and 19th century as a common way for nobles to spend their pastime in their chambers in the winter time and gardens during spring, summer and autumn times (1831). Currently it is considered a traditional game in Poland.

1. Piasecki E., Tradycyjne gry i zabawy ruchowe oraz ich geneza, in: 40 lat od Katedry WF UP do Wyższej Szkoły Wychowania Fizycznego w Poznaniu, Prace okresu Katedry i Studium WF WSW, Poznań 1959, pp. 95- 303.
2. Gołębiowski Ł., Gry i zabawy różnych stanów, w kraju całym lub w niektórych tylko prowincjach, Warszawa 1831.